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About Amy Peterson

Amy Peterson works with the Honours program at Taylor University. She has a B.A. in English Literature from Texas A&M and an M.A. in Intercultural Studies from Wheaton College, and is completing an M.F.A. through Seattle Pacific University. Amy taught ESL for two years in Southeast Asia before returning stateside to teach in California, Arkansas, Washington, and Indiana. She is the author of Dangerous Territory: My Misguided Quest to Save the World. Amy enjoys reading, quilting, hiking, and experimenting in sustainable practices of living.

A Ready Remedy

By |2019-09-23T14:15:38-04:00September 30th, 2019|

Following the park guide, I scribbled notes as he taught about the plants of the Bahamian primeval forest. He told us which trees to avoid. The poisonwood tree, he said, secretes a black sap that causes a painful, itchy rash. But not to worry! The antidote could usually be found growing right next it. “Cut into the red bark of the gum elemi tree,” he said, “and rub the sap on the rash. It will immediately begin to heal...”

Created for Relationship

By |2019-08-12T17:14:08-04:00August 17th, 2019|

There’s a growing “rent-a-family” industry in many countries to meet the needs of lonely people. Some use the service to maintain appearances, so that at a social event they can appear to have a happy family. Some hire actors to impersonate estranged relatives, so that they can feel, if briefly, a familial connection they long for...

Hands-On Learning

By |2019-07-18T12:12:44-04:00July 20th, 2019|

My six-year-old son, Owen, was thrilled to receive a new board game. But after a half hour reading the rules, he was frustrated. He couldn’t quite figure out how it worked. It wasn’t until later, when a friend came over who already knew how to play, that Owen finally got to enjoy his present. Watching them play, I was reminded of how much easier it is to learn something new if you have an experienced teacher...

The Lord Rejoices

By |2019-06-19T16:18:47-04:00June 23rd, 2019|

My grandmother recently sent me a folder full of old photographs, and as I thumbed through them, one caught my eye. In it, I’m two years old, and I’m sitting on one end of a hearth in front of a fireplace. On the other end, my dad has his arm around my mom’s shoulders. Both are gazing at me with expressions of love and delight...

We Need Each Other

By |2019-05-15T11:07:37-04:00May 18th, 2019|

While on a hike with my kids, we discovered a light, springy green plant growing in small clumps on the trail. According to a signpost, the plant is commonly called deer moss, but it’s not actually a moss at all. It’s a lichen. A lichen is a fungus and an alga growing together in a mutualistic relationship in which both organisms benefit from each other...

Watch Out!

By |2019-04-03T14:00:45-04:00April 4th, 2019|

I grew up in warm southern cities, so when I moved north, it took me a while to learn how to drive safely during the long, snowy months. During my first hard winter, I ended up stranded in a snowdrift three times! But after several years of practice, I began to feel comfortable driving in wintry conditions. In fact, I felt a little too comfortable. I stopped being as vigilant...

Searching for Treasure

By |2019-02-27T16:27:44-04:00March 2nd, 2019|

Buried treasure. It sounds like something out of a children’s storybook. But eccentric millionaire Forrest Fenn claims to have left a box of jewels and gold, worth up to $2 million, somewhere in the Rocky Mountains. Many people have gone in search of it. In fact, four people have lost their lives trying to find the hidden riches. The author of Proverbs gives us reason to stop and think: Does any kind of treasure merit such a quest...?

Discovering My True Self

By |2019-02-06T12:12:56-04:00February 9th, 2019|

Who am I? That’s the question a faded stuffed animal asks himself in the children’s book Nothing by Mick Inkpen. Left in a dusty corner of an attic, the animal hears movers call him “nothing” and thinks that’s his name: Nothing. Encounters with other animals spark memories. Nothing realizes that he used to have a tail, whiskers, and stripes...

Steadfast Love

By |2018-12-07T16:10:09-04:00December 9th, 2018|

“I love you!” my dad called out as I slammed the car door and headed into school. I was in sixth grade, and for months we had played out basically the same scenario every morning. We arrived at school, Dad said, “Have a great day! I love you!” and all I said was “Bye.” I wasn’t angry with him or ignoring him. I was simply so wrapped up in my own thoughts that I didn’t notice his words. Nevertheless, my dad’s love remained steadfast...

A Solid Foundation

By |2018-11-23T14:14:53-04:00November 28th, 2018|

Last summer my husband and I toured Fallingwater, a house in rural Pennsylvania designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935. I’ve never seen anything quite like it. Wright wanted to create a home that rose organically out of the landscape, as if it could have grown there—and he accomplished his goal. He built the house around an existing waterfall, and its style mirrors the neighboring rock ledges...