mm

About Keila Ochoa

Keila and her husband are very busy parents of two young children. She helps Media Associates International with their training ministry for writers around the world and has written several books in Spanish for children, teens, and women. She teaches in an International School. When she has time, she enjoys reading, talking to friends over a cup of hot chocolate, and watching a good movie.

Sweet and Bitter

By |2018-03-28T16:01:50-04:00April 3rd, 2018|

Some people like bitter chocolate and some prefer sweet. Ancient Mayans in Central America enjoyed chocolate as a beverage and seasoned it with chili peppers. They liked this “bitter water,” as they called it. Many years later it was introduced in Spain, but the Spaniards preferred chocolate sweet, so they added sugar and honey to counteract its natural bitterness...

Look and Be Quiet

By |2018-03-22T09:29:09-04:00March 28th, 2018|

In the song “Look at Him,” Mexican composer Rubén Sotelo describes Jesus at the cross. He invites us to look at Jesus and be quiet, because there is really nothing to say before the type of love Jesus demonstrated at the cross. By faith we can imagine the scene described in the Gospels. We can imagine the cross and the blood, the nails, and the pain...

White as Snow

By |2018-01-12T10:31:22-05:00January 31st, 2018|

ast December, my family and I went to the mountains. We had lived in a tropical climate all our lives, so it was the first time we could see snow in all its magnificence. As we contemplated the white mantle covering the fields, my husband quoted Isaiah, “Though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow” (Isaiah 1:18)...

What’s Your Father’s Name?

By |2017-09-01T10:35:33-04:00September 15th, 2017|

When I went to buy a cell phone in the Middle East, I was asked the typical questions: name, nationality, address. But then as the clerk was filling out the form, he asked, “What’s your father’s name?” That question surprised me, and I wondered why it was important. Knowing my father’s name would not be important in my culture, but here it was necessary in order to establish my identity. In some cultures, ancestry is important.